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Patient Focused Care


Grady Memorial Hospital patients have access to advanced technology and a healthcare plan
specifically designed for their successful treatment and recovery. From admission until
discharge and beyond, Grady Memorial Hospital's teammates focus on exceptional care, close to home.
Grady Memorial Hospital, Five Oaks Family Medical Clinic, Five Oaks Medical Group, Rush Springs Family Medical Clinic, and Tuttle Family Medical Clinic are pleased to announce our new Patient Portal. This interactive web portal will empower patients and their families to take a more active role in their care by providing easy, secure access to their health information and online communication with Clinic staff.
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A collage of the effects when a population is immunized, few are immunized, and when no one is immunized
Losing some herd immunity might bug you.

Brad Warden, Infection Control RN


Why immunize our children? Sometimes we are confused by the messages in the media. First we are assured that, thanks to vaccines, some diseases are almost gone from the U.S. But we are also warned to immunize our children, ourselves as adults, and the elderly.

It's true; some diseases (like polio and diphtheria) are becoming very rare in the U.S. Of course, they are becoming rare largely because we have been vaccinating against them. But it is still reasonable to ask whether it's really worthwhile to keep vaccinating.

It's much like bailing out a boat with a slow leak. When we started bailing, the boat was filled with water. But we have been bailing fast and hard, and now it is almost dry. We could say, "Good. The boat is dry now, so we can throw away the bucket and relax." But the leak hasn't stopped. Before long we'd notice a little water seeping in, and soon it might be back up to the same level as when we started.
Unless we can "stop the leak" (eliminate the disease), it is important to keep immunizing. Even if there are only a few cases of disease today, if we take away the protection given by vaccination, more and more people will become infected and will spread disease to others. Soon we will undo the progress we have made over the years.

In 1974, Japan had a successful pertussis (whooping cough) vaccination program, with nearly 80% of Japanese children vaccinated. That year only 393 cases of pertussis were reported in the entire country, and there were no deaths from pertussis. But then rumors began to spread that pertussis vaccination was no longer needed and that the vaccine was not safe, and by 1976 only 10% of infants were getting vaccinated. In 1979 Japan suffered a major pertussis epidemic, with more than 13,000 cases of whooping cough and 41 deaths. In 1981, the government began vaccinating with a cellular pertussis vaccine, and the number of pertussis cases dropped again.

So what would happen if we stopped vaccinating here? Diseases that are almost unknown would stage a comeback. Before long we would see epidemics of diseases that are nearly under control today. More children would get sick and more would die.

We don't vaccinate just to protect our children. We also vaccinate to protect our grandchildren and their grandchildren. With one disease, smallpox, we "stopped the leak" in the boat by eradicating the disease. Our children don't have to get smallpox shots anymore because the disease no longer exists. If we keep vaccinating now, parents in the future may be able to trust that diseases like polio and meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccinations are one of the best ways to put an end to the serious effects of certain diseases.

Five Oaks Pediatric Department is available for your Pediatric needs. Appointments can be made by calling 405-224-2100.